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Alice is the protagonist of the 1951 Disney animated feature film Alice in Wonderland.

History

Alice is sitting in a tree with her pet kitten, Dinah, listening to a history lesson being given from her older sister, who repeatedly reminds Alice to stop daydreaming and pay attention. Alice slips away with Dinah, going off about "a world of her own". Near a brook, she spots a White Rabbit with a waistcoat and an oversized pocket watch fretting endlessly over how late he is running. Filled with curiosity over what a rabbit could be late for, Alice hurries after him, begging the rabbit to wait. She follows the rabbit into a small rabbit hole, where the ground gives way, and she tumbles end over end down an endless black hole. Her dress catches her fall like a parachute, slowing her descent, and after floating past assorted household objects such as chairs and pictures aloft in the hole, she lands safely at the bottom. She continues her pursuit of the rabbit to a round, cavernous room with doors on all sides. At one door, in particular, is a cheerful doorknob placed on a door too small for her. At the advisement of the doorknob, Alice drinks from a bottle on the table (which magically appears). Alice drinks the drink (after considering that it may be poison) and says it taste like a cherry tart, custard, pineapple, and roast turkey. As she says this, she shrinks to 'just the right size'. She goes up to the doorknob and is about to turn the knob when he informs her that he's locked. Alice is saddened by this, but the doorknob says (assumes) Alice has the key, which Alice doesn't. The key then magically appears on the table. Alice tries to climb the table but can't due to her small size. The doorknob suggests Alice try the box (which magically appears). Alice opens the box and finds it full of cookies. She takes a bite of one and grows to giant size. Upset by this, Alice begins to cry giant drops of water that turn the room into a pool of her own tears. The doorknob sees the bottle and tells Alice. Alice drinks from the bottle, shrinks, and falls into the empty bottle. The bottle is washed through the keyhole and enters Wonderland.

Once on the shore, she meets Dodo, who is having a caucus racewith some friends. The White Rabbit appears and dashes into the nearby forest. Alice follows, but is delayed by the appearance of Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum. The two comical chums entertain her with the story of The Walrus and the Carpenter until Alice realizes she is wasting time. Taking leave of the two, Alice finally stumbles upon the White Rabbit's home and meets him face to face, but he mistakes her for his housemaid Mary Ann. He orders her to retrieve his gloves from the house. While upstairs, Alice innocently eats a cookie from a jar on the table, but grows to giant size once again with her arms and legs shooting out the windows and doors of the house trying to pull herself out. Seeing what has happened, the White Rabbit enlists the help of Dodo, who resolves to set fire to the house and "smoke the monster out". Spotting a garden, Alice eats one of the rabbit's carrots and shrinks very small. Alice is then able to exit the house and resume her pursuit of the White Rabbit, who has realized how late he is and taken off.

After losing the rabbit a second time, she has a marginally pleasant interaction with a bed of live, talking flowers, who enchant her with "All in the Golden Afternoon". However, when she fails to adequately answer their questions of who she is, they label her as a "weed" and rudely oust her from the garden. Afterward, she encounters a snobby, hookah-smoking caterpillar who shows her a mushroom that can enlarge or shrink her before turning into a butterfly and flitting off.

Alice breaks off two pieces of the mushroom and finds that a small nibble from one of the pieces returns her to normal size. She places the two pieces in her apron pockets and resumes her journey through the forest. Alice then meets the mischievous, perpetually-grinning Cheshire Cat, perched in a tree. After a vexing conversation, the cat suggests she visit the Mad Hatter and March Hare (who is mad too).

The cat vanishes into thin air, and although she does not want to come across mad people, Alice pays them a visit. The two are at an enormous table laden with teapots and kettles, sipping tea, and celebrating one of their 364 unbirthdays. Alice and the duo become friends until they seem to be even madder than they appear. After several failed attempts at a civilized conversation, an exasperated Alice becomes fed up with their madness and storms away.

Before she does, however, the White Rabbit appears and rushes through the party, only to be stopped by the Mad Hatter, who was intrigued upon hearing of the rabbit's tardiness. He claims his watch is the fault, and believes its two days slow, leading to be and the March Hare volunteering to "fix" it. Their efforts merely make things worse, to the point where the watch goes mad and is destroyed by the Hare. The White Rabbit sadly gathers the ruined pieces, heartbroken as it was an unbirthday present, and the trigger word causing the rabbit to be thrown out during the Mad Hatter and March Hare's reprise of their Unbirthday song, leaving Alice chasing after the rabbit once more.

Declaring she has had enough nonsense, Alice decides to find her way home, no longer interested in the rabbit. As she continues on her way she realizes she has come to an unfamiliar part of the forest. Here she encounters a plethora of peculiar animals, who divert her attention even further into the unknown. A resigned Alice reaches her breaking point and starts to believe she may never see her home again and sobs in distress. As she cries, the Cheshire Cat appears in a nearby tree to comfort her, to her utter delight. Alice wails that she is done with following white rabbits and wants to find her way home. The cat directs her to a secret passageway to a twisting hedge maze surrounding a castle.

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